Claybord + Micaceous Iron Oxide + spray bottle

The mad scientist strikes again!    This time, with Claybord and acrylic paint (including one specialty product called micaceous iron oxide), and a spray bottle of water.   I’ve enjoyed the surfaces I’ve tried so far by Ampersand, but Claybord and I had not made friends yet.   During today’s experiment, though, I discovered something about this surface that may change that.   This is a 5×7″ piece of Claybord.

062616

This painting was supposed to be something else entirely, but when I got the background down and sprayed it a bit with a water bottle, I started to get some interesting effects that I liked, and so I kept tweaking it.   In the process, I found out that if you spray this surface with water and wait a few seconds, then come back over it lightly with a bit of paper towel, it will lift most of the paint under each of the water droplets.   Which is where some of the cool effects came from (although I wound up covering most of them – will leave them next time, I think).

Claybord is a very slick surface.   After applying a couple of layers of paint, spraying and playing, I added some Golden micaceous iron oxide to the surface.   (As a Blick affiliate, purchases from these links will help to support my site.)  You’ll see it toward the bottom of the painting.   This is a texture product that will gray down anything you mix it with, and add a fine, gritty texture in the process (like very fine sandpaper once it dries).   At that point, it becomes a drawable surface as well, and apparently, a ground for pastels too.   I found it interesting to spray this product lightly and watch layers appear, almost like mountains were coming into my painting without me doing much of anything.   I liked!   Do I have a lot to learn?   Sure.  I have a lot to learn about everything.   But it was fun, and after watching Chris Cozen demonstrate this on Artist’s Network TV, I’ll be trying it again soon.

I’d love to know what you think about micaceous iron oxide and Claybord.    Lately, I’m having almost as much fun spraying paintings with my water bottle as I am painting!    Peace and Happy Sunday to all.

39 thoughts on “Claybord + Micaceous Iron Oxide + spray bottle

  1. Love these colors Loo! What a great dreamy painting reminds me of a sun or moon in the forest. That iron oxide made for a very cool effect. Love it! I love adding quins and metallics and watching them granulate and move.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Looks like a very bright full summer moon. Are there fairies under those trees…?
    I have not used any of those products, so can’t comment. I do tend to prefer textured paper for everything but as a base for collage, so adding texture seems like a good thing to me though. Keep having fun! (K)

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I have not used these materials, however your painting is very inviting – I feel like I am seeing sunlight beyond a lush forest knoll. Gorgeous effects and composition. You certainly have three wonderful things going here: 1) interesting composition with a focal point, 2) feeling with the textures and colors, and 3) beauty!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Aw, thank you C. I hemmed and hawed whether I even wanted to post this one or not. Thanks for your encouragement. Learning how to play with micaceous iron oxide. I really like the grit, the bit of metallic and the dark undertones. I’m just having fun playing this summer, I think.

      Liked by 1 person

            1. The Frugal Crafter. Somehow I found her on YouTube and watching her paint watercolors made me believe I could somehow do it too. She’s the main reason I got started in art. I grew up with two artists in the family and I 100% knew I couldn’t be one, because I couldn’t do anything the way they did it. So I gave up early on. But I loved to quilt and wanted to make a series of art quilts on freedom. Couldn’t draw a simple bird silhouette, and dug my heels in. Found Frugal Crafter and the rest is history! Long answer to a short question, sorry for the ramble.

              Liked by 1 person

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